Yes they are sour; They ought to be. But let us run.

STORY 1:

There was this man selling flowers on the pavement. He was trying hard every other day to make his ends meet with the meagre cash he got from that petty shop. He used to lead a normal life as any other man would think to.

And on one day, a rich man passed by in a posh car who stopped at the flower shop. He was not determined to buy flowers from that shop but somehow he thought of stopping by. He, without speaking anything, took a 5$ currency note from his wallet and offered the florist. The florist honestly denied it but upon compulsion he was made to accept it. The rich man went away in his car.

Is helping out of pity the right way of respecting a person? Yes!? What? Well, let me finish the story.

After few minutes, the rich man came back again to the same florist and said: “Hey sorry, I would not have downgraded you. You sell these flowers and earn your daily bread out of real hard work. You never asked for alms or food from others. You respect your job. You deserve the same self-respect from me as well. I honor your sincerity. I would take these flower bouquets for the money I had given you.”

Every man has a day to understand his self-respect.

And that story made me think that whether helping someone out of pity would really be a help. No. If pity is the first instance towards helping, that itself carves an upper embodiment of your attitude in front of the needy. If helping comes by respecting one’s self it will truly speak.

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STORY 2: In another story, there was a shopkeeper who ran a grocery. One day a small guy came to the shop and just looked around without asking or buying anything. The guy simply asked for the price of those toffees kept in the front row in bottles, but couldn’t buy any. Taking advantage of the situation, the shopkeeper wanted to play a game on the boy. He called him and showed him a 5$ note and a 5cents coin. He then said that he will shuffle the note and coin and finally the boy should choose one and the boy could take what he choose. The shopkeeper, shuffled the note and coin in front of the boy, making sure the boy saw which was in which hand.And then, he asked the boy to choose one hand to which the boy chose the hand with the 5cents. The shopkeeper was happy and gave him.

This repeated for another 2 days and a regular customer was all watching this. Out of curiosity, he approached the boy and enquired why he kept on choosing the 5cents, when he could easily own the 5$ and be richer than what he actually was. To that the boy replied, “Yes sir, you were right! But why should we downgrade ourselves? If I had taken 5$ on the first day itself, the game would be over. Now think who is losing his own self-respect daily.”

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The title of “sour grapes” was inspired from my fellow mate who explained “The whole point of not having what you wish for, motivates you”. In my childhood as well, I had yearned for a lot but i couldn’t enjoy them. A normal wooden pencil instead of a micro-tip pencil; there was no TV in my home wherein I wished long for one. These unachievable grapes are meant to be sour. They are sour so that they constantly motivate you to work for it.

If you are used to getting whatever you ask for, it loses its value. The self-respect inside everyone has more value than one’s pity or anything else. Being humans, we ought to get and hence give respect. Let the sour grapes be there telling you that the race in life is not over yet. And once you get what you have been longing for, the whole purpose of aiming goes meaningless. Let the grapes be sour and our race continue.  

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